Dorothea Haus Ross Foundation 


 

                                                                      Dorothea Haus Ross Foundation
                                                                                         
    2018 Grants



1.  Global Fund for Children:   $125,000

            To support and develop the capacity of 4 locally led, community based organizations focused on disabled children and 4 organizations focused on trafficked and exploited children:

            Children with Disabilities:


            Divya Down’s Development Trust (DDDT) | Bengaluru, India


            DDDT provides holistic support to individuals with Down syndrome through special education, therapy, and essential skills development—with the ultimate goal of preparing children to enroll in formal school or enter the workforce in order to lead a life of dignity and respect.

            Sama Foundation | Bangalore, India


            Sama promotes inclusive education for disabled children in Bangalore and has developed India’s first disabled-focused psychosocial care curriculum that they are introducing into Bangalore’s schools.

            Thai Child Development Foundation (TCDF) | Pak Song, Thailand


            TCDF works with local school and healthcare providers to create improved models of care for special needs children in rural Thailand and foster inclusion to lessen the isolation, stigma and shame that these children and their families often encounter in traditional rural society. 

            Zy Movement | Bangkok, Thailand


            Zy Movement’s mission is to ensure that children with movement disabilities grow up in an inclusive, nurturing environment; through a range of education, recreational, sports and vocational programs Zy helps children and parents create a future of autonomy and independent living.

           Child Trafficking:

            Baan Nana | Mae Sai, Thailand


            Baan Nana provides shelter, education, nutrition and support to reduce the number of children living and working on the streets of Mae Sai, a crossing point and trafficking location on the border between Thailand and Burma.

            Our Voice | Bishek, Kyrgyzstan


            Our Voice focuses on transitioning teenage orphanage residents, often without any support, safety net or life skills, and at high risk of substance abuse, prostitution and trafficking, to successful independent living.  Services include psychological, legal aid, job placement and securing housing and vocational education.

            Suprava Panchashila Mahila Uddyog Samity (SPMUS) | West Bengal, India


            SPMUS works to eliminate child trafficking and child marriage in West Bengal.  Using a holistic program model, SPMUS staff – most of whom have been victims themselves – rescue and support girls and women subjected to trafficking, domestic abuse and abandonment and work closely with government and police leaders to ensure enforcement of relevant laws.

            National Federation of Female Communities of Kyrgyzstan (NFFCK) | Novopavlovka Village, Sokuluk District, Kyrgyzstan


            NCFFCK is a youth founded and youth led organization that promotes and protects girls rights and empowers rural girls to influence their families and communities to reduce bride kidnapping, physical abuse and improve their knowledge of sexual and reproductive health.



2.  iACT:  $39,780

            “Little Ripples: Improving the Quality of Early Childhood Education for Refugee Children in Eastern Cameroon” | Cameroon


            The grant will enable iACT to implement its refugee co-created Little Ripples curriculum and provide early childhood education to 1,350 refugee children who have fled from Central African Republic to Cameroon.  iACT will also build community and parental support to sustain attendance; will develop a system to measure the social and emotional development of children in this refugee population; will strengthen the capacity of partner JRS to operate the program in future years; and will enable iACT to develop new partnerships and expand the use of the curriculum in other refugee situations.
 

3.  Fund for Global Human Rights:  $40,000

            “Releasing and Rehabilitating Child Soldiers in the Democratic Republic of the Congo” | Kasai, South Kivu, North Kivu and Oriental regions, Democratic Republic of the Congo


            To allow the Fund for Global Human Rights to strengthen three leading DRC-community based organizations negotiate the release of child soldiers from armed groups and provide direct services to these former child soldiers and support their reintegration into society; to strengthen protections for           children through research, monitoring and advocacy; and to train other organizations to provide these type of services in the central regions of the country. 


4.  Kupona Foundation / CCBRT:  $43,928
            “Improving Quality Community-Based Inclusive Development Services in Tanzana” | Dar es Salaam and Mosi, Tanzania


            The grant will expand the reach of Tanzania-based disability hospital CCBRT’s globally respected disability rehabilitation program, increase the number of children and families able to access and benefit from quality services, and build capacity for high quality rehabilitation services among other government and private healthcare providers in Tanzania and the East Africa region.


5.  Soccer Without Borders:   $45,000

            “Supporting Refugee Youth in Kampala to Learn, Develop and Thrive” | Kampala, Uganda  

             The grant will enable Soccer Without Borders to double the number of non-English speaking refugee children it works with in Kampala; to adapt and deliver its “English Language-Integrated Soccer Curriculum” to those children and develop the “Pathways” program to help its students gain access to Ugandan schools.


6.  Women for Afghan Women:   $30,000

            “From Prison to Thriving:  Moving Children Imprisoned with their Mothers in Nangarhar to Kabul’s Children Support Center” | Kabul, Afghanistan  

            The grant will relocate 25 children who are living in the Jalalabad prison with their imprisoned mothers to the Children’s Support Center home in Kabul; provide them with the first 12 months of care, rehabilitation, education and enrichment activities; and enable them to visit their mothers in prison at least twice a year; the grant will also provide for an upgrade the Kabul center’s database system.


7.  Children’s Agenda:   $50,000


            “Building an Integrated Model of Early Childhood Development Services in Rochester, NY | Rochester, NY

            The grant will allow Children’s agenda to work with government and private entities to leverage sustainable, long-term funding that fills in the gaps of young children’s unmet needs for critical supports (developmental, health, social-emotional, educational) in the greater Rochester area.

 
8.  ANERA:   $40,000


            “Responding to Preschool Children’s Psychosocial Needs in Gaza’ | 10 Locations in Gaza Strip, Palestinian Territories

            To enable ANERA to expand its Right Start Gaza-based early childhood development program and create the Gaza Preschool Summer Arts Program; the program will utilize expressive arts therapy to strengthen the resilience and coping capacities of 850 children in 10 locations throughout the Gaza Strip during the summer of 2018; 70 teachers will receive special training in arts therapy and working with traumatized children, which they will be able to incorporate in their teaching practice throughout the year.


9.  Cooperative for Education (CoEd):  $35,00


            “Guatemala Computer Centers Program” | Solola and San Marcos States, Guatemala 

            The grant will enable CoEd to build three new self-financing computer centers in rural Guatemala that will provide school-based computer instruction and access to computers for 330 children and their communities each year.  CoEd will establish and monitor a revolving fund for each school into which small user fees paid by parents will be collected, with the funds saved in the revolving accounts to provide periodic equipment maintenance and hardware upgrades every five or six years. 


10.  International Refugee Assistance Project:   $35,000


            “Family Reunification and Protection for Unaccompanied Refugee Children at Risk’ (Integrating Child Protection and Social Services) | Greece

            The grant will allow IRAP/Safe Passages to add a professional social worker to its legal services team.  This expansion will provide child-protection social service referrals for 400 vulnerable, homeless and unaccompanied Syrian refugee children currently in Greece and who are undergoing the lengthy legal process leading to reunification with family already resettled in Europe.


11.  Little Sisters Fund:  $30,000


            “Community Projects and Educational Opportunity Expansion’ | Banke, Dang, Parsa, Makwanpur, Sindhaualchowk, Nepal

             The two part grant will allow Little Sisters Fund to increase from 10 to 30 the number of local Community Projects that girls are able to plan, champion, lead and build in their home communities and also allow for the overall expansion of the core scholarship program to include 75 new girls from existing and 3 new isolated and poor communities.


12.  Vision for the Poor / Visualiza:  $40,000

            “Reduction of Childhood Refractive Error and Eye Disease Campaign in Rural Guatemala” | Villa Nueva, Poptun and Melchor-de-mencos, Guatemala


             The grant will enable Visualiza, the leading eye hospital in Guatemala, to provide eye screenings and related care to nearly 30,000 children in the catchment area of three new rural eye care clinics that Visulaiza and Vision for the Poor have established and also train local school teachers to conduct basic eye exams in the future.

 
13.  Street Child US:  $50,179


            “Breaking the Bonds for Disabled Girls from Nepal’s Untouchable Musahar Caste” | Dhanusha, Mahottari and Siraha, Nepal

             The grant will allow Street Child to implement program enhancements to enable 364 disabled girls to participate in Breaking the Bonds, a comprehensive 3 year initiative to provide education, vocational training and income generation activities and rights awareness and advocacy for 3,000 girls from Nepal’s isolated, deeply disenfranchised and impoverished Musahar caste.   Ross support centers on the educational component to deliver an expedited curriculum leading to basic literacy and numeracy, and will provide for a disability inclusion teacher training course and related materials; enhancements to school buildings to ensure accessibility and provide needed individual disability aids and learning materials.

Two year grant ($25,179 in year 1; $25,000 in year 2)


14.  Freedom for All / Voice of the Free:  $30,140

            “Mobilizing youth Movements Among Indigenous Peoples to Prevent Child Trafficking in the Philippines’ | Palawan and Mindanao Islands, Philippines

            The grant will support an expansion of Voice of the Free’s iFIGHT anti trafficking education and prevention program, and reach an additional 15,000 youth in tribal areas of the Philippines.  Through large school assemblies which feature music, dance, testimonials and various media, and follow up social media and organizing activities, Voice of the Free warns young people about the dangers of online sexual exploitation and other forms of trafficking; encourages them to join local iFIGHT clubs; creates awareness among parents about the signs of trafficking and how to report them to authorities; and mobilizes and trains teachers and local community leaders to handle reports of trafficking. 


15.  Polus Center:  $50,000

            “Wings of Peace – A Trauma Counseling Program for Syrian Child Refugees” | East Amman, and Za’atari and Azraq refugee camps, Jordan

             This grant builds on the Foundation’s 2015 grant to Polus to develop a counseling program specifically intended for the treatment of Syrian Refugee children who have experienced extreme trauma and PTSD.   Polus will expand the ‘Wings of Peace’ arts therapy program that was developed under the first grant, deepening data collection, analysis, and evaluation to allow the therapy model to be widely shared with other child mental health providers in the region and also train youth who have gone through the program to become peer support counselors and mentors to younger children entering the program.


Two year program ($25,000 in year 1; $25,000 in year 2)



16.  Perkins School for the Blind International:  $50,000

            “Serbia:  Keeping Children with Multiple Disabilities out of Orphanages” | Belgrade, Serbia

             This grant will enable Perkins to begin work in Serbia to build family and community capacity to educate and care for disabled children at home and in their communities.   Without capacity or community services for care and education, families often have no choice but to house children with multiple disabilities in remote institutions and orphanages.  This pilot project will: increase the number of community based teachers and paraprofessionals skilled in working with children with multiple disabilities; establish four community school-based model programs of education and care that will accommodate 500 children; and initiate of program of home based parental and caregiver support and education.  
                                                



Grants by Program Category:


Disabilities: 


            Global Fund for Children                                             $62,500

            Kupona Foundation/CCBRT                                        43,928

            Vision for the Poor/Visualiza                                       40,000

            Street Child                                                                             25,179

            Perkins School for the Blind International           50,000

                                                                                                              $221,607


Trafficked and Exploited:


            Global Fund for Children                                            $62,500         

            Women for Afghan Women                                         30,000

            Fund for Global Human Rights                                   40,000

            Cooperative for Education                                           35,000

            Little Sisters Fund                                                              30,000

            Freedom for All/Voice of the Free                           30,140                                              

                                                                                                             $227,640

 
Refugee:



            iACT                                                                                        $40,000

            Soccer Without Borders                                                45,000

            Anera                                                                                         40,000

            International Refugee Assistance Project          35,000

            Polus Center                                                                         25,000

                                                                                                             $185,000                


Other:



            Children’s Agenda                                                           $50,000                                                                                                                       


Total Grants Made in 2018:                      $684,247

Total Commitments Made in 2018:     $734,247